The Spotlight movie

The movie Spotlight is out and although I have not seen it yet, I hope to soon, as it is a very interesting look at how the story of the Roman Catholic clergy abuse of children happened in Boston and how it was covered up by this powerful religious organization. Even the CBC, here in Canada, has reported on it, interviewing a Boston Globe reporter who was involved in breaking the story. The CBC radio program can be listened to here: http://www.cbc.ca/radio/q/schedule-for-wednesday-january-27-2016-1.3421631/spotlight-s-sacha-pfeiffer-says-investigative-units-are-endangered-species-1.3421784. The Catholic group SNAP has promoted this film. As the newspaper, the Guardian stated in a recent article:
In 2002, the Boston Globe’s Spotlight team, a group of five investigative journalists, uncovered the widespread sexual abuse of children by scores of the district’s clergy. They also revealed a cover-up: that priests accused of misconduct were being systematically removed and allowed to work in other parishes.
The team’s investigation brought the issue to national prominence in the US, winning them the Pulitzer prize for public service. The journalists’ story, and those who suffered at the hands of the clergy, are the subject of Spotlight, a Hollywood movie starring Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo and Rachel McAdams. It is a love letter to investigative journalism and a reminder that, 13 years and some $3bn in settlement payments later, survivors in Boston and beyond are still waiting for satisfactory long-term action from the Vatican.
The Guardian also declared regarding the US victims group:

Phil Saviano was battling to get his story heard long before the Spotlight team’s stories were published. Saviano, a survivor who was abused by his parish priest from the age of 12, had sent the Globe information on the Boston clergy that reporters originally missed. In the film, Saviano (played by actor Neal Huff) tells the Spotlight team that, for a kid from a poor family in Boston, being groomed by his priest was like being singled out by the Almighty: “How do you say no to God?”
Saviano, now in his 60s, was one of the victims who refused a settlement from the church and retained, unlike others, his right to speak freely about his experience. He’s the founding member of the New England chapter of the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests. After the Spotlight investigation, Snap’s membership swelled to more than 22,000 as victims came forward, according to its executive director, David Clohessy.
“Before Spotlight’s work, Snap members were usually ignored,” he says. “They were unsuccessfully trying to warn parishioners, parents, police, prosecutors and the public about this massive, ongoing danger to kids. After Spotlight’s work, people started to pay attention.”
The Guardian article can be read here: http://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/jan/13/spotlight-reporters-uncovered-catholic-child-abuse-boston-globe. I look forward to seeing this interesting film.

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